Mississippi Kite

Mississippi Kite

Mississippi Kites are small and slender birds of prey. They have light gray heads, red eyes with a dark eye patch in front, and small, strongly hooked dark bills.

Their underparts are light gray while their upperparts are dark gray. Their primary wings are dark gray, secondary wings are white, and wingtips are black. They have long, dark tails and red legs and feet. 

Male and female Mississippi Kites look similar except that males are slightly paler than females. Juveniles have heavily streaked brown and white bellies, heavily mottled wings, and long, banded tails.

  • Ictinia mississippiensis
  • Length:  13 – 17 in (33 – 43 cm)
  • Weight: 12.6 oz (357 g)
  • Wingspan: 34 – 37 in (86 – 94 cm)

Range

Mississippi Kites breed in southern and eastern United States and migrate to South America, mainly Argentina, Paraguay, Uraguay, and southern Brazil.

Habitat And Diet

You can find Mississippi Kites in small woodland forests in the prairies, dense old-growth hardwood forests, and more recently, in tree-lined areas like windbreaks, shelterbelts, city parks, golf courses, and other urban areas.

It is best to keep your sights above the trees for they love to sail on the wind and float in the air. In cityscapes, they’re likely to perch on tall buildings. 

Most of the time, Mississippi Kites forage from the air and catch their prey and eat them while in flight. They capture medium to large-sized insects like grasshoppers, beetles, cicadas, and dragonflies.

They also hunt from their perch in trees and snag snakes, turtles, small birds, lizards, frogs, and fish. Sometimes, they hang around bison, horses, deer, and people and snatch whatever insects are flushed out by their activities. 

Mississippi Kite Call:

Nests

Nests of Mississippi Kites are built on most types of trees. They can use tree branches that are a few feet off the ground or even as high as 115 feet up. They can build them on their own using twigs, leaves, and moss or they can re-use old, abandoned nests by other birds or even squirrels. 

Both adults build the nest together and the female lays one to three eggs in it. They both take the time to incubate the eggs for about twenty-nine to thirty-two days. Mississippi Kites usually nest in colonies and will sometimes accept help with the nest from a one-year-old bird.

They’re also very protective of their nest and will attack anyone, people and animals alike when they get too close. 

Fun Fact:

Mississippi Kites are more successful at producing offspring in their urban habitats because there are fewer predators there than in forests and woodlands.